Hey! I'm Amber, 14yrs. Welcome to my blog (Of sorts).
I'm a wannabe writer/voice actor.
You're likely to find anything and everything on my blog. :)
(Too many fandoms)

 

Using Inaction to Raise the Stakes

fictionwritingtips:

Recently someone asked me how to raise the stakes of their novel without big action scenes and I thought this question deserved further attention. It’s important to remember that you don’t need to use action to create tension—there are other simple ways to do it.

Here…

Seven Deadly Fight Scene Sins

howtofightwrite:

Below, we’ve listed some common sins that can detract from enjoyment of a fight scene. As always, rules are made to be broken. It’s also worth understanding something, before you try though.

Why Are You Thinking? We Should Be Fighting!

When working on a fight scene, it’s…

How to edit a novel in 5 weeks: Part 1

fixyourwritinghabits:

Guest post by Laura Harris (lauraharrisbooks)

5 weeks might seem arbitrary, but this is the task I faced after winning Lulu’s Wrimo Accelerator competition. It’s not usual circumstances for first-time authors, but if you ever find yourself in a similar situation (or…

How to edit a novel in 5 weeks: Part 2

fixyourwritinghabits:

Guest post by Laura Harris (lauraharrisbooks)

Find Part 1 here

Week 3: Improve

Key tasks:

  • Continue fixing problems in list

  • Make the reader want to keep reading

Now is the time to get through all those smaller plot-related items on your list. You…

Positive and Negative Human Behavioral Traits

fictionwritingtips:

Someone recently asked me for a list of human behavioral traits, so I thought I’d type up a quick list to help with writing. Obviously most people will be a mix of both positive and negative behavioral traits, and also some positive traits can be stretched too far and…

Quick Tips for Adding Romance to Your Story

fictionwritingtips:

This is not advice for writing a romance story or erotica. I’m talking about adding romantic elements to your novel or writing a love interest. If your main character has a love interest, you have to learn how to write romance properly and you need to learn how to strike…

How to Write an Engaging First Chapter

fictionwritingtips:

I probably get this question every day, so I think it’s about time I did a post on it. Many writers are concerned with writing their first chapters and they have trouble figuring out what they should include and what they should leave out until later.

When you’re…

impishtubist:

shadowstep-of-bast:

tomhiddllestop:

IF YOU LOVE WRITING BUT DON’T HAVE THE INSPIRATION FOR A 10-PART BOOK SAGA YOU SHOULD TAKE A LOOK AT THIS SITE

IT’S INCREDIBLY HELPFUL AND CAN FOR INSTANCE GENERATE TOPICS AND FIRST LINES, CONTAINS LOADS OF EXERCISES AND YOU CAN FIND PLENTY OF WRITING TIPS.

BLESS YOU I LOVE YOU OH MY GODS I’VE NEEDED THIS

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE?

(Source: noshitloki)

referenceforwriters:

OK NO BUT GUYS

sarcoptid:

regalium:

IDK IF YOU KNOW ABOUT THIS WEBSITE YET, BUT I DON’T EVEN CARE IF YOU DO.

CHARAHUB BASICALLY ALLOWS YOU TO MAKE A DIRECTORY OF ALL YOUR OCS.

LIKE SO

image

AND SO (they let you get super detailed)

image

It lets you store 100 characters (you gain 2 extra slots…

maggie-stiefvater:

I can’t believe I’m showing you this, but I’m telling myself it is inspirational or educational. This is from the draft of The Raven Cycle I wrote when I was 19, 13 years and over a million published words ago.

This is the character introductions. Note: Sean = Ronan. And Kavinsky doesn’t even have a name.

Oh it’s so bad- don’t lose your nerve, Stiefvater- hit post-

theroughcopy:

What’s the point of worrying about pacing? Well, it’s actually a very important consideration. 
Pacing is how fast or slow you’re telling the story. It can show the reader how much time has passed (for instance, whether you need to show lot of events during a short period of time, versus if you’re showing events over the span years and your characters age with the progression of the plot).
Lord of the Rings, for instance, is told at a slow pace, for the most part. As you so clearly recall, most of it is about the journey, so that’s most of what they show- the journey, which meant in Frodo’s case a whole lot of walking. And eating. And walking. But, mostly eating.
Whereas, say, an adventure stories, like Harry Potter or Percy Jackson and the Olympians are more action-oriented, and keeps things moving quick. 
That doesn’t mean it’s all eating and walking in Lord of the Rings, though. Scene to scene, you can lure the reader along at a different pace, raising the tension high in some, and raising it even higher in others.
But, what do I really mean by pacing, and how can we apply it to our stories?
Let’s see what Courtney Carpenter of Writer’sDigest.com thinks, shall we?
Ms. Carpenter has some brilliant tools here to help you make your story better!
1. Word Choice and Sentence Structure: “The language itself is the subtlest means of pacing. Think concrete words (like prodigy and iceberg), active voice (with potent verbs like zigzag and plunder), and sensory information that’s artfully embedded. If you write long, involved paragraphs, try breaking them up.”
2. Summary: Caution yourselves with this one, but it’s a useful tool. Basically, if you have a long-period of time pass without much action, you can summarize what happened, if you need to keep things short. I’d try to limit how much I use this, if I were you, but hey, maybe you can make them super interesting somehow.
3. Short Chapters and Scenes: this way, it’s easy to digest, and it keeps the reader moving along pretty quickly (and, added bonus, feeling quite accomplished fro reading so much).
4. A Series of Incidents in Rapid Succession: without any time to breathe in between, your characters will have to deal with quite a lot all at once- and leave the reader reeling.
5. Scene Cuts: “Also called a jump cut, a scene cut moves the story to a new location and assumes the reader can follow without an explanation of the location change. The purpose is to accelerate the story, and the characters in the new scene don’t necessarily need to be the characters in the previous scene.”
6. Prolonged Outcomes: this is all about suspense. Tension. This is where the readers are burning through the pages, trying to see if their favourite character gets saved from the burning building.
7. Dialogue: how much the conversion resembles a game of ping-pong really depends on how fast it’s paced. If you want things to speed up, go back and forth with little extra info.If it’s a quieter, slower moment, you can let them speak in their long, winding sentences. It’s all up to you.
8. Action: you’re showing, not telling. The sentences are short. It’s on. Nothing gets your story off it’s proverbial rump like having your characters do something.

theroughcopy:

What’s the point of worrying about pacing? Well, it’s actually a very important consideration. 

Pacing is how fast or slow you’re telling the story. It can show the reader how much time has passed (for instance, whether you need to show lot of events during a short period of time, versus if you’re showing events over the span years and your characters age with the progression of the plot).

Lord of the Rings, for instance, is told at a slow pace, for the most part. As you so clearly recall, most of it is about the journey, so that’s most of what they show- the journey, which meant in Frodo’s case a whole lot of walking. And eating. And walking. But, mostly eating.

Whereas, say, an adventure stories, like Harry Potter or Percy Jackson and the Olympians are more action-oriented, and keeps things moving quick. 

That doesn’t mean it’s all eating and walking in Lord of the Rings, though. Scene to scene, you can lure the reader along at a different pace, raising the tension high in some, and raising it even higher in others.

But, what do I really mean by pacing, and how can we apply it to our stories?

Let’s see what Courtney Carpenter of Writer’sDigest.com thinks, shall we?

Ms. Carpenter has some brilliant tools here to help you make your story better!

1. Word Choice and Sentence Structure: “The language itself is the subtlest means of pacing. Think concrete words (like prodigy and iceberg), active voice (with potent verbs like zigzag and plunder), and sensory information that’s artfully embedded. If you write long, involved paragraphs, try breaking them up.”

2. Summary: Caution yourselves with this one, but it’s a useful tool. Basically, if you have a long-period of time pass without much action, you can summarize what happened, if you need to keep things short. I’d try to limit how much I use this, if I were you, but hey, maybe you can make them super interesting somehow.

3. Short Chapters and Scenes: this way, it’s easy to digest, and it keeps the reader moving along pretty quickly (and, added bonus, feeling quite accomplished fro reading so much).

4. A Series of Incidents in Rapid Succession: without any time to breathe in between, your characters will have to deal with quite a lot all at once- and leave the reader reeling.

5. Scene Cuts: Also called a jump cut, a scene cut moves the story to a new location and assumes the reader can follow without an explanation of the location change. The purpose is to accelerate the story, and the characters in the new scene don’t necessarily need to be the characters in the previous scene.”

6. Prolonged Outcomes: this is all about suspense. Tension. This is where the readers are burning through the pages, trying to see if their favourite character gets saved from the burning building.

7. Dialogue: how much the conversion resembles a game of ping-pong really depends on how fast it’s paced. If you want things to speed up, go back and forth with little extra info.If it’s a quieter, slower moment, you can let them speak in their long, winding sentences. It’s all up to you.

8. Action: you’re showing, not telling. The sentences are short. It’s on. Nothing gets your story off it’s proverbial rump like having your characters do something.

Description: Writing a Scene of Pure Shock

writing-questions-answered:

Strengthening Your Character Through Personal Relationships

fictionwritingtips:

In most of your stories, your characters will have personal relationships that you’ll need to develop. A great way to strengthen your characters is through their personal relationships, so it’s extremely important that you spend time planning them out. Whether it’s with…

Edit A Month: Killing Your Darlings

fixyourwritinghabits:

Edit-A-Month is resumed!

Eveyone has to cut something they love. It is inevitable, the burden of being a writer. In order to improve the general story, you have to remove bits that drag it down. Making those decisions, though, is a tough choice, and sometimes it’s tougher to even know where to start. Here are things to look for when killing your darlings:

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